Ethos / Business Plan

The Scottish Orienteering 6-Day Event is a high quality orienteering event in terms of terrain, maps and organisation. It also has a friendly and helpful approach towards both the competitor and the volunteer on whom the event depends.

It is also recognised that one of the purposes of the event is to aid with the promotion and development of the sport of orienteering in Scotland (through the contributions to the funding of professional staff, clubs and squads).

You can download a copy of the Scottish 6 Days Business-plan Feb2011

The Scottish Orienteering 6-Day Event is a high quality orienteering event in terms of terrain, maps and organisation. It also has a friendly and helpful approach towards both the competitor and the volunteer on whom the event depends.

It is also recognised that one of the purposes of the event is to aid with the promotion and development of the sport of orienteering in Scotland (through the contributions to the funding of professional staff, clubs and squads).

You can download a copy of the Scottish 6 Days Business-plan Feb2011

It is ESSENTIAL to provide:

For the competitor:

  • A strong event ‘brand’ (develop the identity and logo for each event within the overall ‘brand’ of the Scottish Orienteering 6-Day Event).
  • High quality areas with a variety of terrain.
  • High quality maps and courses for all.
  • Travelling distances to the competition areas (from the event centre) which are kept to a minimum while still accessing high quality terrain.
  • Ease of entry for competitors from the UK and abroad. The entry form should be easy to complete and provide comprehensive competitor information for the event organisation.
  • A strong Elite competition.
  • Family-friendly facilities (e.g. split starts for parents, string course).
  • A well-maintained and up-to-date and informative event website. The website should provide (in relevant, separate sections) information for the competitor, sponsors, press and people / businesses in the locality of the event.
  • Entry lists posted regularly on the website (at least weekly).
  • A prompt response to enquiries.
  • An accurate, informative and innovative event programme (printed, as well as an on-line version).
  • An event which stays at the forefront of developments in orienteering (both with respect to technology and in the forest).
  • Assembly Areas carefully planned with clear information displayed in a common style from Day 1 through to Day 6 (signposting to starts, finish procedures, results, map display).
  • The assembly and finish adjacent to one another. The car parking should also be adjacent if at all possible.
  • No remote finishes, unless there are exceptional circumstances.
  • Competition procedures that are identical each day (e.g. start procedure, finish and download).
  • Six ‘Standard’ races for all except the Elite competitor.
  • Information (and any points of contact between the competitor and event) that is staffed by knowledgeable, helpful officials.
  • First Aid and safety cover.
  • A prize-giving that is a memorable event for all.
  • An efficient results service (during and after the event). The detail of this will develop as technology changes.

For the club volunteer:

  • Support for these volunteers through the Board of Directors of the 6-Day Company. This should also ensure continuity to the event series.
  • Comprehensive, up-to-date manuals for event officials.  These manuals should build on the experiences of officials as reported from all previous events and be reviewed and revised after each event.
  • Good lines of communication between the Central Organising Committee, the Day Officials and the Club representatives at all times.
  • The opportunity to compete in every day at the event. Links should be established so that help can be sought from non-Scottish clubs; punching starts are issued to on-the-day helpers to allow the organiser flexibility in allocating manpower.
  • As far as possible, a reduction in manpower requirements: e.g. planners and controllers combine starts where possible, plan drink stations carefully and avoid multiple manned road crossings.
  • IT used to its maximum effect.
  • Paid-for professional services where the demands on volunteer time and expertise become too onerous.

For the development of the sport of orienteering in the local community and Scotland:

  • Sponsorship links some of which will be event specific and some will be long-term.
  • A positive relationship with the local community which encourages direct involvement in the event in as wide a variety of ways as possible.
  • A ‘lasting legacy’ of orienteering in the area (e.g. permanent courses, increased profile of the sport in the community, return visits of competitors to the event area).

Ideally it is also DESIRABLE to try and ensure:

  • An event centre closely linked to an event campsite and social events which are varied and of a high quality.
  • Six different venues for the 6 competitions with close proximity to the Event Centre (if possible).
  • A good holiday location for the event.
  • An accommodation service which aims to aid links to a range of available accommodation.
  • The walks to the starts (especially for the younger juniors and older seniors) are kept to a minimum.
  • At the Assembly Area a range of caterers and equipment suppliers.
  • A well designed and wide range of event merchandising available for sale.
  • Senior Controller reports for each day which are published on the event website. 
  • Where possible, an informative daily commentary.

Environmental concerns to minimise the impact of the event must be taken in to consideration:

  • Encouragement to the competitors to use buses from the Event Centre to each Assembly area.
  • Car sharing to events will be given positive incentives.
  • Recycling facilities are made available to the competitors and organisers.

19th Aug 2008